According to a study by researchers from the Medical University of São Paulo, people who have the cellulite bacteria could be cured by treatment with a chemical known as “cocos-de-robin”.

The study, published in the Brazilian Medical Journal, examined whether the chemical could treat people who suffer from the condition, which causes severe itching and pain.

It said people who had the bacteria should take antibiotics, and they should take care of their skin.

The study was done by researchers at the university’s Center for Applied Microbiology and Immunology (CIMIM) and the Instituto de Asistencia de Salud Carlos III.

Researchers from CIMIM and the University of Sao Paulo examined the effects of oral antibiotics on the bacteria, and found that the bacteria can be treated.

The bacteria were also tested on mice, and researchers found that treatment with the chemical resulted in the bacteria being able to be cleared from the skin.

CIM IM, who was not involved in the study, said that “in the study of CIM immunopoiesis we are investigating the potential use of cocos de robin for the treatment of the cellulites of people with HIDRAD.

Dr João Fortunato from the University’s Center of Microbiology, said the study showed that it was possible to treat the cellulitic bacteria by the use of antibiotics. “

We are also looking into its potential applications in skin-infection prevention, in dermatology, in the development of a drug, and in clinical applications of the chemical, including in the management of acne, dry skin, or allergic skin conditions.”

Dr João Fortunato from the University’s Center of Microbiology, said the study showed that it was possible to treat the cellulitic bacteria by the use of antibiotics.

“In fact, the researchers found the bacteria were able to clear the bacteria from the patients’ skin even without any antibiotic,” he said.

“This is an important step in the way of treatment and therefore an important finding for us.”

The study also found that when given antibiotics, the bacteria was able to recover.

“When antibiotics were given to patients, the antibiotic-resistant bacteria were recovered in 80 per cent of the patients treated with cocas de robins,” said Dr Fortunatello.

In addition, the study also showed that the coconut oil in which the cicadas were kept had a strong antimicrobial activity. “

It is also interesting to note that when the bacteria is treated with the antibiotic, the antibiotics can reduce the level of the bacteria in the patients skin.”

In addition, the study also showed that the coconut oil in which the cicadas were kept had a strong antimicrobial activity.

Dr Faimonato said that it would be possible to further investigate this possibility by using the cis-coconut oils to treat cellulite, but it was not yet clear whether that would be beneficial or harmful.

He said that the study was not meant to be an endorsement of the use and consumption of coconut oil, but rather to see if there is a potential benefit for the coco-coca beverage as a treatment for cellulite.

“But in the long run, we have to see whether coco, or any of the coconuts, could be beneficial for the cellulita,” he added.

The researchers are also currently testing a solution using the chemical to treat people with ulcers, but said that further research was needed to make that clinical trial possible.

“To treat ulcers with antibiotics, we must understand the mechanisms that produce the ulcers and what the antibiotics are capable of,” said CIM Immunopsychologist Professor Paulo de Jesus.

“Therefore, it would require further research to determine whether this treatment works against the bacteria and whether it is beneficial.”

Dr Faimato said the research would allow the cocos-coco beverage to be used to treat patients with other diseases, and that cocos could be used as a topical medication to treat dry skin.