A new Australian study has found that bee stinging can cause severe side effects.

The study is the first to look at the possible effects of bee stung and found that they could be serious for bees and pollinators.

Bee stings have been a controversial topic of study for years, as they are thought to cause allergic reactions.

The University of New South Wales study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, examined the symptoms of a group of bees that were stung by a bee sting.

They then treated the bees with antibiotics, but found that it caused severe symptoms such as inflammation and pain.

The authors concluded that the treatment of the bees was ineffective.

Dr Jennifer Dolan from the University of Sydney said it was important to understand how the bees’ immune systems respond to the chemicals and the potential side effects of the treatment.

“We can’t really tell if these chemicals are doing more harm than good,” she said.

“This study is really important for understanding the impact of these chemicals on bees.”

Dr Dolan said the study showed that bee sting treatments had the potential to cause serious side effects, particularly for pollinators such as honey bees.

“The results of this study really put the brakes on any further research on this,” she told ABC News.

“I think it’s really important to recognise that we’re dealing with very small numbers of bees.”

There are studies showing that bee populations are actually declining, so there is no way that we can safely use these chemicals in this way.

Dr Poon said bee stINGS can cause serious allergic reactions, and some people who have been exposed to bee stinger pollen can develop symptoms including severe rash, itching and swelling. “

It’s very clear that beekeepers need to consider using more effective treatments if they’re going to be using them to manage bee sting,” he said.

Dr Poon said bee stINGS can cause serious allergic reactions, and some people who have been exposed to bee stinger pollen can develop symptoms including severe rash, itching and swelling.

“These are serious health issues, and we need to make sure that these chemicals can be used safely,” he added.

Bee sting treatment ‘safe’ for bees, study finds It’s not clear how bees could respond to a bee stingly treated.

Dr Dola said there were no direct studies comparing the effects of different treatments.

“If we’re going by the results, then there’s no direct evidence to show that these are safe for bees,” she explained.

“There’s no clinical studies on bees in this case, and there’s not really a clinical trial of bee sting treated with these chemicals.”

A number of pesticides are known to cause bee string damage, including pesticides called neonicotinoids.

The Department of Primary Industries has issued a warning to beekeepers, urging them to use neonic pesticides with caution.

The Australian Veterinary Medicines and Prescriptions Agency has issued an advisory saying bees should be monitored closely for symptoms of bee poisoning.

“In the context of the bee stinking situation in Australia, it’s important that we get the facts right,” Dr Poo said.

The ABC’s Rachel Logan reports from Sydney.